Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3706: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump Presidential Debates - Part II - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





Last night in the first of the three planned 2016 Presidential Debates, Donald Trump committed many unforced errors - one of which is discussed below.

During 1:27 - 1:28 in the above video excerpt, Mr. Trump can be seen committing a body language faux pas that he repeated throughout the night.





















Despite his extensive experience in the reality show television world, Trump seems not understand microphones. By bending down to his mic - he subordinates himself to Hillary Clinton - while the democratic candidate did not stoop to speak. This effect is amplified because he's fairly tall (6'2") compared to her (5'7").

Donald was beta to Hillary's alpha. And he sought this out.
























See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3705: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump Presidential Debate - Trump: I'm 'smart' for paying no taxes

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3704: Hillary Clinton, Likability and Presidential Debates  

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3701: Hillary Clinton, Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3688: Vladimir Putin, Phone calls, Body Language and Emotional Intelligence 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3663: Olympic Wrestler Frank Molinaro gets bitten by Ukraine's Andriy Kvyatkovskyy

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3626: Mike Pence's Wikipedia Profile Picture says "WTF" 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3598: Gary Johnson, Donald Trump's Wall and Body Language  

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3561: Catchphrase, Andy Samberg, Bryce Harper, Gigi Hadid and Body Language


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, September 26, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3705: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump Presidential Debate - Trump: I'm 'smart' for paying no taxes - Body Language & Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





The First of the 2016 U.S. Presidential Debates were held tonight at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York.

There's easily a semester's worth of Nonverbal Behavior material in this roughly 90 minute debate. What follows here is but a sampling.

Note the video above - but before you even push play, look for a moment at the initial display frame. Hillary Clinton's feet are resting slightly less than a shoulder's width apart - while Donald Trump's feet are closer together in both an absolute and relative sense. Standing with one's feet too close together (as Trump is doing here) is somewhat akin to standing at attention. It tends to increase anxiety, emotional discomfort and a beta emotional tone. Standing with your feet about a shoulder's width apart (or slightly closer) engenders fluidity of both thought and speech (truly improving "thinking on your feet") - while simultaneously making one feel more alpha, assertive and strong.





















The image above was captured during the 1:07 mark of the above video just after Mr. Trump says, "That makes me smart" (after Secretary Clinton said he paid no taxes during some years). The expression on Mr. Trump's face (particularly his mouth corners vectoring laterally and downward) was that of fear. This lasted for about 1.0 seconds (so it's not classified as a "microexpression" although it's still relatively short-lived). The image below is a close-up of this same moment.

Overlapping (during the 1:07 - 1:09 segment and seen very easily in the video), Mr. Trump is also rocking back and forth on his feet at a relatively high frequency while simultaneously gripping the forward sides of the lectern.

While holding this part of lectern can project alpha emotional tones (depending on the other nonverbal signals with which it is clustered) - Mr. Trump does this far too frequently during this debate (and when compared with previous debates). As with most alpha body language, what's good in small doses - will backfire in larger doses. More is not better. This makes him seem tired, anxious and out of his element.

The overall gist of this nonverbal cluster displayed seen in this short segment of this Presidential Debate indicates clearly that the topic of his taxes makes Mr. Trump very nervous and even fearful.

























See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3704: Hillary Clinton, Likability and Presidential Debates

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3702: Hillary Clinton: "Why aren't I 50 points ahead (of Trump)?''

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her" 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3683: Brock Turner Released from Prison after 3 Months 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3676: Colin Kaepernick Says He Be Sitting Down During the National Anthem

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3646: Melania Trump, Donald Trump, Visas, Citizenship and Body Language

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3631: Donald Trump's Acceptance Speech at the GOP Convention


Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3604: Nigel Farage, Jean-Claude Juncker, The Brexit and "Why Are You Here?"



_____________________________________________________________________________________

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3704: Hillary Clinton, Likability and Presidential Debates - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)























Since Hillary Clinton came into the America's national consciousness, she has occupied five primary roles:

1. First Lady of the United States
2. U.S. Senator of New York
3. Presidential Candidate for 2008
4. U.S. Secretary of State
5. Presidential Candidate for 2016

Of these five positions, the one for which most Americans would say she was the most "Likable" (by far) is when she served as Secretary of State.

Although it occurs with many professions - physicians, attorneys, teachers/professors and politicians are particularly more likely to report, to varying degrees, that when they are practicing, teaching or legislating - they slip into another emotional state, with certain parts of their personalities becoming amplified - while other portions are minimized. This morphing is, in large measure, a variety of behavior similar to method acting.

Of course, some people accomplish this switch to a greater degree than others. And if they're honest, they'll also confess that they will feel and thus behave differently when they're in these respective modes (versus in their personal lives).

When Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State - she spoke differently, used different vocal tones and even walked differently. It was when she was "most comfortable in her own skin". Anyone who has followed her career would have noticed this contrast. Moreover the body language and facial expressions Secretary Clinton projected were also a good bit different from those used in her other professional roles. She was indeed more likable.

Intriguingly, months before she made her public announcement, a careful observer could tell immediately when Hillary made her own private commitment to run for president - for she "switched back" into her previous (non-Secretary of State), Senate-persona.

So if I were working with Mrs. Clinton on her nonverbal skills for her presidential debate preparation vs. Donald Trump (or for the campaign in general), one crucial piece of advice I would give her is to recreate and step back into the emotional mindset she held when she was Secretary of State.

See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3703: Debate Advice for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3701: Hillary Clinton, Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis


Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3699: The Tulsa Police and the Shooting Death of Terence Crutcher

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3689: Times Square Kiss on V-J Day

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3672: Jessica Alba, Swass, Body Language and Emotional Intelligence 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3624: Terrorist Attack in Nice, France

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3445: Harrison Ford Re-enacts 'I Love You' Scene from Star Wars

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3407: GOP Debate, the National Anthem and Shades of Napoleon


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3703: Debate Advice for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)
























Most people, politicians included, fail to realize that not only does one's body language indicate in great detail what they are both thinking and feeling - but also that by changing their own facial expressions and body postures - they can also, very powerfully and with great nuance, regulate their emotions.

























When it comes to a debate, we seldom remember more than a few words a candidate says - but we'll always remember their nonverbal behavior. Indeed, in the context of a debate, a candidate's body language will make or break the performance.

Dear Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump: I've prepared a few pointers for your upcoming Presidential Debates. This list is not exhaustive, but it's a good start.  

1. Care should be taken to turn and "whole body point" toward your moderator or an audience member asking a question. Just rotating your head and torso isn't enough. Turn and point your whole body towards them. This should always include your eyes (with quality eye contact), face, torso and feet - pointing directly at them. Such whole-body pointing conveys respect and full attention. Those who are watching will feel empathy and will appreciate this respect vicariously.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2016: Hillary Clinton, Roosevelt Island, Building Rapport and Body Language

2. Looking down when your opponent is speaking should be kept to a minimum. Depending on the other nonverbals present, a downward gaze will project feelings that you're being scolded, feeling guilty or acquiescing. A candidate who does this will be viewed as someone who accepts a beta roll while recognizing the other person as an alpha.

One exception to this axiom is during note taking. Using an occasional moment to jot down ideas will project greater attention and engagement. It will also send sincerity signals and convey intelligence to the audience. Intriguingly, this practice may also be used deliberately in order to down-regulate your own anxiety.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3642: Does Donald Trump Know Vladimir Putin?

3. Foot Position - Stand with your feet about a shoulder's width apart (slightly closer for women). Standing in such a manner will not only convey confidence, assertiveness and strength - but it will also up-regulate these emotions internally.

Many candidates stand with their feet too close together - Donald Trump did so when visited Mexico on the stage next to President Peña Nieto. This action engenders and projects and a lower confidence level and other subordinate type feelings - and it in no way appears presidential. Standing with one's feet a shoulder's width apart, or slightly closer, will make you feel more confident and improves the fluidity of both thought and speech. It literally helps you to "think on your feet" better.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3678: Donald Trump's Trip to Mexico - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence

4. Your feet must also be positioned flat on the floor. This also sends signals of strength, assertiveness and confidence.

In 2012, during the very first of his debates with Mitt Romney, Barack Obama frequently stood with one leg crossed in back of the other - such that his toe was pointed down touching the floor. This sends feelings of aloofness and a casual, almost sloppy attitude which is not in context for a presidential debate.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2137: Mitt Romney vs. Barack Obama - First Presidential Debate - Barack's Bad Body Language

5. Hand and arm gestures should be in congruence with, and proportional to your verbal message and vocal tone. Donald Trump uses too many alphas and hyper-alpha hand and arm movements. These will solidify his base, but will tend to drive away the swing voters. It's a perfect example of a very common phenomenon in nonverbal behavior - what is good in small doses, often backfires in larger doses. Those who use alpha body language signals will also tend to over-use them.

It's also a big mistake to use too few hand and arm gestures - for this will send signals of low trustworthiness and low confidence.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3241: Trump - a Hyper-Alpha Donald vs. a Kinder, Gentler Version - Body Language and Likability

6.  Under no condition, ever touch your face or neck. If you've never read a single article on nonverbal behavior, most people will intuitively perceive the speaker to be feeling anxiety - or guilty of deception. It makes people instantly feel uneasy.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3553: Donald Trump, Deception, Facial Touching and Empathy

7. Two facial expressions which should be strongly avoided are disgust and contempt. The expression of anger, is also discouraged - but it is a bit more expected and acceptable given the right context. Donald Trump displays both contempt and disgust much more often than he should - and more than any American Presidential candidate since the advent of television. Again, this will also solidify his base, but alienate undecided voters.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her"

8. Another nonverbal which should be strongly avoided is "The Steeple" (more specifically, the conventional steeple). It shouldn't be used at all. I've never seen a photograph or video of any American president every using a conventional steeple. Not one (Donald, are you listening?). The reason for this behavior pattern is those who use the conventional steeple are also seeking power - as well as arrogant and condescending. That's not to say American Presidents have never been arrogant or that they ceased to seek greater power or influence. The conventional steeple is a rapport destroyer though - and for at least the last 65 years, the presidents knew this intuitively.

It's a given that a person who uses a conventional steeple (longer than a second or two) is either deliberately posing (and been given poor advice to do so) or has an inferiority complex and is over-compensating.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3527: North Carolina's Governor Pat McCrory Statement regarding His Order That "Clarifies" Controversial Gender Identity Bill

 9. Never put your hands in your pockets. Of course most of the time this applies to men. It's surprising how often people will make this mistake. Some people will even do so because they believe it makes them look thoughtful and deliberate - and yet at the very best it sends signals of non-engagement, beta behavior and emotional dissonance - and (depending on the other signals present) it can also project that they're feeling intimated, fearful and being deceptive.

Body Language Analysis No. 913: Mitt Romney - Low Confidence, Low Trust and Demure

10. Do not smile over-frequently or out of context. Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are guilty of this mistake. It's often interpreted (and accurately so) - as a signal of insincerity. Any smiles must be sincere. Politicians try to smile much more often than most professionals - but few smile sincerely (a Duchenne smile). Always remember to initiate smiling with your eyes. Forget about your mouth - if you begin with your eyes, your mouth will follow. 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3567: Donald Trump's Most Common Social Smile (Pseudo-Smile) Variant

11. Most every politician (and insincere person) over-uses their forehead. Donald Trump's forehead is heavily Botoxed - while Hillary's forehead is minimally so. Over-contracting (and elevating) one's forehead, especially the central forehead (with or without a partial mouth smile) is a strong signal of insincerity (and when chronically over-done, it's a sign of antisocial personality disorder). When used occasionally (as with 96% of the population) - it telegraphs emotions of disbelief, contempt or arrogance (which, as human beings we're all entitled to feel once in a while).

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3641: How Marina Joyce is like Donald Trump

12. Get a full night's sleep. You may, in four months time, be leader of the free world and an alpha personality - but you're not from the planet Krypton.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2135: Ronald Reagan in Nashua, New Hampshire "I'm Paying for this Microphone Mr. Green!"

13. Secretary Clinton - don't open your eyes too widely too often. Occasionally as a mode of emphasis is okay and normal. But you do this far too often. It makes you look like you're trying to hard to convince people (and you in fact are).

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3487: Scott Pelley to Hillary Clinton, "Have you always told the truth?"

14. One body language configuration that should be used (but not over-used) is holding the sides of the lectern - however towards the front (closest to the audience). This signals both strength and assertiveness. Performing this too much however will backfire.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3605: John Kennedy, Hands on Podium and Body Language

15. Both Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Trump tend to use the political point far too often. For those of you unfamiliar with the "Political Point" - this is when the fingers are configured in an "Okay" sign which is used  in lieu of and to "soften up" what otherwise would almost certainly be index finger pointing. While an index finger point should almost never be used, the political point when over-used comes off quite insincerely (and is used almost exclusively by politicians).

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3635: Michelle Obama's DNC Speech and a Body Language Mistake

16. Once the initial handshake occurs, don't encroach onto your opponent's personal space until the debate is finished. Donald Trump is the most likely to commit an error here (à la Rick Lazio and Al Gore). If Trump does this even once, Clinton will win the debate. Some of Secretary Clinton's advisors may be even be trying to figure out ways of her provoking Trump - and thus causing him to walk in her direction. Checkmate.

The only exception for this would be in the context of some variety of apology (in which case there should also be a whole body point with a handshake).

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3209: G7 Summit - Angela Merkel, Barack Obama and Matteo Renzi - and a Major Body Language Faux Pas

17. Even though over a hundred million American's will be listening and watching you - act as if you're speaking with four or five of your best friends in your own living room. And when you're doing this - although you're speaking regarding subjects for which you're more knowledgeable - keep in mind that you love these people and you have empathy for them.

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2134: A Watershed Body Language Moment: Nixon - Kennedy Debates 1960



_____________________________________________________________________________________

Friday, September 23, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3702: Hillary Clinton: "Why aren't I 50 points ahead (of Trump)?'' - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





Hillary Clinton referenced Donald Trump yesterday during a video conference with the Laborers' International Union of North America. Among other things she said, "Why aren’t I 50 points ahead (of Trump)?"

The clip above is a portion of this video conference. When she said, "Nobody should be fooled!", the Democratic Presidential nominee pointed with both her index fingers toward the audience. Pointing with an index finger (forefinger) is universally negatively interpreted across all cultures, ethnicities and countries - and pointing with both index fingers is considerably more so. Politicians can get away with this nonverbal faux pas prior to the conventions - for in these settings they are relying on their hard-core political base (although it's still not recommended) who will largely jump off a cliff for their perceived leader.

However once the front runners are chosen and the candidates are chasing the swing voters, the double index finger point will server to alienate them. It's not at all a rapport builder - rather it's a rapport destroyer.

Note Mrs. Clinton's face - her eyebrows are vectored downward and drawn together - while her eyelids are opened significantly wider than baseline. Her lower lids are also more tense while Hillary's mid-face is tightened, her nostrils are flared and her jaw is jutting forward. Almost everyone will recognize this as a classic expression of considerable anger.

It's important to recognize the connection between facial tension and hand tension. When the face expresses anger - the hands are also virtually always negative gestured. And when the hands are configured with anxiety, anger or frustration - this also influences the face in a negative direction. Mrs. Clinton's facial expression in this moment is a clear example of this phenomenon.

Summary: The index finger point, particularly when performed with both hands will alienate all but the loyal voters. Mrs. Clinton is playing into Trump's hand here (pardon the metaphor). She should also stop using this gesture because it leads to an up-regulates of anger. And ... Hillary Clinton should absolutely not display this nonverbal signal during the Presidential Debates.

























See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3701: Hillary Clinton, Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3426: Barack Obama, Executive Action, Gun Control and Body Language

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3699: The Tulsa Police and the Shooting Death of Terence Crutcher

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3694: Donald Trump, Jimmy Fallon and Messing Up Hair

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3684: Barack Obama's and Vladimir Putin's "Stare-Down" at the G20

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3669: Jordan Spieth, Bill Murray and the Asymmetrical Smile

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3533: Johnny Depp and Amber Heard - Australian Biosecurity

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3636: Donald Trump, Hillary's Emails, Putin and Russia


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3701: Hillary Clinton, Between Two Ferns With Zach Galifianakis - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





When one agrees to make an appearance on Funny or Die's - Between Two Ferns, a particular brand of humor is certainly to be expected. And a person can make the argument that that's exactly what Hillary Clinton was going for with Zach Galifianakis. Many of her supporters will probably say the democratic candidate did a pretty fair job too.







When we slice it thinner though, we see that with an extremely high percentage of the time, whenever Mrs. Clinton sits down for an interview, she sits back, crosses her ankles, crosses or grasps her hands - and leans her head and neck backward.

In the above scenario, there is at least some attempt at humor - but in the situation below she was in an interview with Chris Coumo - who of course hails from a family of democrats and thus one would certainly think is for her a relatively friendly setting. Yet still she has a virtually identical body language cluster.

This is one of Mrs. Clinton's default nonverbal positions - and she needs to change it. She should always use a chair with arms - this gives engenders a much more relaxed and natural feel whether in an interview or sitting alone. Resting elbows and/or forearms on the arms of the chair (at least some of the time) coupled with a forward leaning of the torso, away from the back of the chair will up-regulate her energy, engagement and likability. Intriguingly - such a configuration will also lead to more fluid thought and speech.

The backward tilt of Mrs. Clinton's head and neck in particular evokes the age-old colloquial: "Looking Down Your Nose". This projects a patronizing and arrogant emotional tone and does not help Hillary win over the swing voters. Moreover it also sends messages of low engagement and low tolerance - e.g., "You're not important to me", "I don't really want to be here" - and even "I don't like you".


























See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3700: George Clooney comments regarding the News of Brad Pitt's and Angelina Jolie's Divorce

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3698: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump in Upcoming Presidential Debates, My Contribution to This Month's Article in "The Atlantic"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3688: Vladimir Putin, Phone calls, Body Language and Emotional Intelligence 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3683: Milo Yiannopoulos believes trolling is his way of "Doing God's work" 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3672: Jessica Alba, Swass, Body Language and Emotional Intelligence

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3578: Megan Fox, Body Language and Dismissive Emotions

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3478: Donald Trump Jr Does Not Like his Father's Statement, "I Love the Poorly Educated"


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3700: George Clooney comments regarding the News of Brad Pitt's and Angelina Jolie's Divorce - Body Language & Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





Although in this brief interview George Clooney first discusses publicly that his friends - Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are getting a divorce - by evaluating his body language we can discern that at the very least he had foreknowledge of something strongly amiss in their marriage - and was he not surprised.


























During 0:25 - just after the CNN reporter says, "... Angelina and your friend Brad ..." and Clooney answers, "Oh, what happen?" - Clooney's forehead and eyebrows contract and elevate - but simultaneously his upper eyelids partially close. This is an unnatural facial movement of emotional dissonance and not in any way indicative of surprise or sincerity - moreover in this context it's a signal of foreknowledge and insincerity.



























Less than a second later Clooney pulls in the right side of his jacket.




























This is essentially simultaneous with the repositioning of his notebooks higher and more centrally over his chest. This configurational change is an emotionally protective barrier formed just after he hears the word "divorce".

























Then at 0:27 George looks up to his right - the quadrant to which most right-handed people (as is Clooney) momentarily gaze when they are visually recalling a specific event.



























Then at 0:28 Clooney again closes his upper eyelids - this time completely - while contracting and elevating his eyebrows and the full width of his forehead.
























Clooney continues (at 0:32), "... That's, that's a sad story and unfortunate for a family [smiling]. Ah, it's an unfortunate story, ah, ta - about a family. I feel very sorry to hear that..."

Smiling at this specific time is extremely out of context. This phenomenon is a variant of what, in body language parlance, is known as "Duping Delight". Clooney thinks he has fooled us into believing that this is the first he's heard the news (Moreover, a paralanguage signal of his insincerity here is that he feels the need to tell us twice).

























During 0:43 Clooney displays a classic expression combination of regret and disgust

Summary: Although this is unpleasant "news" for George Clooney to hear, he had prior knowledge of trouble in Brad Pitt's and Angelina Jolie's marriage. This "news" did not surprise him. It's important to point out here that although Clooney is an accomplished actor and he can fool us when he's "in character", when George is just being George, he's no better than average at deception.


See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3699: The Tulsa Police and the Shooting Death of Terence Crutcher

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3698: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump in Upcoming Presidential Debates, My Contribution to This Month's Article in "The Atlantic"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3689: Times Square Kiss on V-J Day

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3674: Drake Presents Rihanna with Vanguard Award - 2016 Video Music Awards - MTV

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3620: Cristiano Ronaldo's Injury, UEFA Euro 2016 and Body Language

Nonverbal Communication Quiz-Analysis No. 2967: George Clooney & Amal Alamuddin Wed in Venice - All The World's a Stage - Sincerity level of Smiles

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3036: Angelina Jolie runs into Amy Pascal after email Hack

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2434: Brad Pitt's Tongue-in-Cheek regarding Reasons for Choosing to Work on "World War Z"

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3699: The Tulsa Police and the Shooting Death of Terence Crutcher - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)





Last Friday in Oklahoma the Tulsa Police shot Terence Crutcher. Mr. Crutcher's SUV had broke down. The police were called regarding an abandoned vehicle. Mr. Crutcher was unarmed and there was no weapon found in the vehicle. An investigation is ongoing.

Law enforcement protocol dictates that once a suspect has been shot, tasered, etc., and the scene is secure, the police (or other professionals whom they designate) are to immediately render first aid. In this example, approximately 2 minutes 32 seconds transpired between the shooting and care.

Note the three officers are slowly backing up clustered in close proximity to each other (touching) - making a themselves an easy target had there been any armed opposition. They were neither securing the area nor rendering medical care.

You're probably familiar with the saying, "Flight, Fight or Freeze" describing the ways human beings behave when there's a perceived severe threat - and in this scenario we've seen a form of each. The police first fought, their brains (temporarily) froze - and then they took flight (retreated).

This is a textbook example of how, when we're far from emotional baseline (the calm 'normal' self), our objectivity - even if we're trained professionals - often goes out the window. And while there is a multitude of nonverbal signals contained in this video, this particular one is a body language manifestation of emotional processing (indeed emotional shock) - for although the officers' intellects realizes what's occurred, their emotional brains are still trying to come to terms with the events.









































































































See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3698: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump in Upcoming Debates, My Contribution to This Month's Article in "The Atlantic"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3693: Grace VanderWaal Wins America's Got Talent Season 11

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3683: Milo Yiannopoulos believes trolling is his way of "Doing God's work"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3634: Debbie Wasserman-Schultz, the Democratic National Convention, Emails and Body Language

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3562: Police Officer Tim Purdy, De-Escalation and Body Language 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3669: Jordan Spieth, Bill Murray and the Asymmetrical Smile 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2993: Fight in Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport - Passengers Break Up Homophobic Attack - Threat Assessment Warning Signs 

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3676: Colin Kaepernick Says He Be Sitting Down During the National Anthem


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3698: Hillary Clinton v. Donald Trump in Upcoming Presidential Debates, My Contribution to This Month's Article in "The Atlantic" - Body Language and Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO, PHOTOS)




















Hillary Clinton's and Donald Trump's personalities are polar opposite. This of course will make for a very interesting set of debates beginning 26 September 2016. A tremendous portion of the success or failure of any debate can be distilled down to the candidates' Body Language. I'm honored to have contributed to James Fallows' article this month in "The Atlantic" - regarding the upcoming Presidential Debates.


See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3697: NYC Bombing Suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami in Custody - Body Language, Threat Assessment and Emotional Intelligence

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3685: Hillary Clinton at Commander-in-Chief Forum

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3692: Donald Trump Gets Interrupted by Pastor in Flint, Michigan

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3681: Hillary Clinton's Low Transparency

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3686: Donald Trump regarding his National Security Briefings

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3648: Hillary Clinton, “I may have short-circuited”

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2125: Presidential Debate Body Language - George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot 1992


_____________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, September 19, 2016

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3697: NYC Bombing Suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami in Custody - Body Language, Threat Assessment and Emotional Intelligence (PHOTOS)





































NYC and New Jersey Bombing Suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami is now in Custody. The grainy photo above is from a routine public ID imaged in the past (it's NOT his mugshot).

Note his jaw jut, the tension of his mid-face, the flaring of his right nostril, eyebrow lowering, the tension of his lower eyelids and his partial upper eyelid closure.

This facial expression indicates an amalgam of anger and contempt. We're all allowed to feel these emotions - for we are all human. However whenever anger, contempt and/or disgust are expressed chronically - it's a strong indication of impulse control disorder. While this phenomenon has always been true, but with the ubiquity of social media it's relatively easy to vet those who we may hire, be employed by, date, etc. Of course a very small percentage of those who frequently exhibit these nonverbal signals will go on to commit acts of terror or violence, but they will have difficulty controlling their temper.

See also:

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3696: Jimmy Kimmel's 2016 Emmys Opening Monologue - Sarah Paulson brought Marcia Clark

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3695: Donald Trump, "Take Their Guns away", "Let's see What Happens to Her"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3693: Grace VanderWaal Wins America's Got Talent Season 11

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3664: Benjamin Netanyahu, Viktor Yanukovych and Vladimir Putin

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3656: Usain Bolt, Justin Gatlin and the 100 M Olympic Final

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3565: Adolf Hitler, Jesse Owens, Archie Williams and Body Language

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 3522: Felicity Jones in New Star Wars Trailer: "Rogue One"

Nonverbal Communication Analysis No. 2231: A Common Facial Expression of Mass Killers - Using Body Language as a Threat Assessment Tool

_____________________________________________________________________________________